Educators, How Does the Phrase”M-STEP Prep” Make You Feel?

My parents were educators for 30 years and now I’m in my 20th year in the profession. That means I have spent my entire life around educators. Educators of all different positions, in various districts, who carry countless philosophies. Throughout the year, I find myself in conversations with them and I there is one question I like to fire off to see what their stance is. It’s a question that we start to hear more and more around schools this time of year. 

download.pngHow does the phrase “M-STEP prep?” make you feel?

I’m partially asking how they feel about teaching to the big standardized test students in our state take each spring. I’m also asking if they put a higher priority on learning or test performance, as those aren’t always the same thing. I’m kind of asking how much time is spent varying from the curriculum to spend on components in the test that are not in the curriculum. I’m curious as to how much time their school or district spends on M-STEP preparation and what range I find in the responses. I’m also hinting a little bit at what direction they get from those above them and how they feel about it.

More than anything else, I’m asking if the educator is locked in an internal battle regarding the importance of standardized tests in today’s educational world.

The M-STEP matters. Let’s not be foolish. I know that student success on a standardized test shows a snapshot of what a student knows at that moment and that is important. The way the state broadcasts the scores of a district is a large part of how a district is measured. That matters. As a student gets older, their ability to perform on a standardized test means thousands of dollars and acceptance into universities. 

I’m convinced that learning matters more. Students can demonstrate learning in so many more ways than a standardized test can measure. The time spent preparing students to take the test can never be regained. I always wonder what type of new discoveries, questions that could be explored, or important content could have been covered instead of the M-STEP prep. When do we get to a point where what is covered in the curriculum aligns with what is on the test? Are we moving closer or further away from this? 

No right answer. No wrong answer. Just a lot of educators developing, thinking, reflecting, and wrestling with an internal belief system regarding what is best for their students.

So, educators, how does the phrase “M-STEP prep” make you feel?






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